Congrats to Epigemeno and Christine on their Wedding Day!

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Epigemeno and Christine were married in a spiritual ceremony by the lake  in Humble, Tx  on April 26th, 2014. A new family was created by the blending of these two lives and it was inspiring to witness the devotion of this couple.  They were supported by close family and friends in what turned out to be a simple but sophisticated nuptial. Many blessings to both of you as you enter married life!

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Congratulations Michael and Jordan on your marriage

Congratulations Jordan and Michael who were married in a  ceremony at the lake in Atascocita, Texas,  just before Michael’s military deployment. Your love and affection was inspiring and a fitting tribute to STILL MOMENT MiNISTRY – A Wedding and Family Ministry 5th anniversary, uniting married couples! Each wedding has been special to me. It has been quite a journey so far. Many blessings for your future Together!
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Theresa and Tony tie the knot on 5/24/2014 in Kingwood Texas!

It was a hot day but a very cool wedding! Theresa and Tony tied the knot in front of family and friends who came long distances to see lifelong friends become partners forever.  South American food served lakeside was the order of the day and befitting such a unique and special couple. Congrats Theresa and Tony. Many blessings as you continue your journey together!

Asian Wedding Traditions

Incorporating ethnic traditions into your wedding can create a more intimate environment for you and your family.

While we most associate the color white with wedding in this country, the color red is the color of weddings in China. Red is the color of luck and joy, and it makes perfect sense that it is such an important color for weddings. You can incorporate the red color in a variety of ways such as the tablecloth, candles, napkins, and other decorations. You may change into a red dress during the wedding reception. You may choose red wedding flowers, or your bridesmaids may wear a red dress. You can create a Chinese feel without red by dressing in a tradition Chinese dress. White is not a color used in Chinese traditional weddings. White is used at funerals, so avoid white on your invitations, decorations or bridal clothing. Do not use red ink on white paper, because white implies death and is used at funerals. Gold on reddish paper or cream color paper works well.

Chinese couples honor their ancestors with a tea ceremony. It is not only a beautiful ceremony, but it could be very educational and entertaining for your guests.

Another Asian tradition, from India, is having the brides and groom’s hands and feet painted with henna. The tradition is normally performed by a henna professional. The hand and foot henna stains the skin for up to a few weeks.

Japanese weddings include a sake ritual. It is also know as the sake sharing tradition. This ritual represents building a strong bond between the families. The sake ritual can be part of the wedding ceremony or the wedding reception. Sake cups can make great wedding favors for a Japanese wedding ceremony.

There is no law that you have to have an ethnic wedding, but it may add sentiment to your big day.

A Brief History Of The Bridal Veil

 

Since mediaeval times, Anglo-Saxon and Anglo Norman women’s attire included veils. The tradition of wearing a veil was part of most married women. Historically unmarried girls wore no veils. The veil had a practical purpose for it had covered the woman’s hair, their neck and the chins. Veils had served a functional purpose, protecting women’s skin from wind and sun damage. By the 15th century, hoods become prevalent, and veils became less widespread.

Historically, brides wore their hair flowing down their back on their wedding day to symbolize their virginity, now the white veil is often said to symbolize purity.

The bridal veil may have a place in mythology. Ishtar, ancient Goddess of Love, came from the depths to me her betrothed; the vapors of the earth and sea covering her “like a veil”. According to folklore, the tradition of the veil changed to include a blusher after Jacob was tricked into marrying his beloved Rachel’s sister, Leah, who was distinguished under the full veiling. It seems there is much to be said for scrutinizing the bride before it is too late!

The development of the wide loom and silk tulle in the 19th century gave women a sheer covering that enhanced their attractiveness. The wedding veil signifies modesty, privacy, youth and virginity. That way of thinking still has significance on bridal etiquette, as only a first-time bride wears a veil.

Remember, your bridal veil supposed to complement your bridal gown. The most popular colors are white, diamond white, and ivory. Diamond white is an excellent choice if your bridal gown has a sheen. The lifting of the veil at the end of the ceremony symbolizes male dominance. If the bride takes the initiative in lifting it, thereby presenting herself to him, she is showing more independence.

White bridal veils symbolize the bride’s purity and modesty. Moreover, veils are used to add to the final touches of a wedding dress and to frame the bride’s face.

Christmas Ornament Wedding Favors

There are many couples that get engaged around the holidays. Many of these engagements happen on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day. To remember that special time, some like to plan their wedding around the same day the next year. Christmas weddings are very special and can always create a great memory for the couple and for their family. When it comes to favors, one great idea is to have a Christmas ornament wedding favor for everyone who comes.

This type of favor is great because people can hang these on their trees year after year and will remember your wedding. They are also wonderful because there are so many things you can do with your Christmas ornament wedding favor. The possibilities are limitless, and you can always find or make something that will go with your wedding colors and theme, especially if that theme is Christmas. They don’t have to cost a lot either, though it will depend on what you want and if you make them on your own.

When making a Christmas ornament wedding favor, you have a few great choices. You can get glass bulbs that are empty, and you can find great things to put inside them. If you go to your local craft store, you can usually find these in packages, and you can also find anything to go inside there as well. You can also buy colored bulbs and have them etched, which is something you can do on your own if you wish, or decorate them any way you can. Get some extras so you have some practice, and also because you may just break a few while you make them. If you have children coming to the wedding, don’t forget about them. You can find plastic types for their favors so they don’t feel left out.

If you don’t want to make them on your own, you can find some ideas and a great selection for the Christmas ornament wedding favor online. You can usually get them special make exactly like you want them, and they can be shipped to you before your wedding date. You should do this early, so you can send them back if there is a mistake, or you can ask for more if some were broken during shipping. No matter what way you go, you can always find something wonderful, and your guests will love the favor idea.

4 Tips to Help Write Personal Wedding Vows

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A person’s wedding is one of the most memorable, important, and high points in an individual’s life.  At a time when a man and a woman want to make the ultimate commitment to spend the rest of their lives together, the desire to have personalized vows is certainly understandable.  This is one of the most unique and special days in a person’s life, so if you want to speak your own personal wedding vows, than by all means, you should go for it!

Writing your own vows can be intimidating.  Wedding days always add pressure to even the most mundane of tasks, and certainly writing the vows you want to say to your significant other in front of all your friends and family is no small matter!  Still, don’t let fear cause you to go along with some basic commonly used wedding vows if you really want that personalized touch.  Just follow a few basic tips, and this will help you be on your way to writing the tips your future spouse deserves!

1. Write from the heart.  Your wedding day represents the epitome of love between you and your future spouse.  The two of you are together for a reason.  Anything you write should be honest and from your heart, because that is what will really make your words special.

2. You don’t have to be Robert Frost or Emily Dickinson.  If you are a poet, great.  Keep in mind, though, that in the end words are just words.  Your wedding vows do not have to be an amazing classic piece of literature—they need to be an honest display of your feelings for the other person.  Don’t use long poetical words if all it does is put distance between your words and your feelings.

3. It’s okay to brainstorm.  Before you set down to write everything, make a list of the things about your spouse that you absolutely love about your spouse, then make a list of the commitments you want to make.  Figure out what parts of those lists you really want to include (keep in mind the vows are read in front of families and friends) and keep those.

4. Short and Sweet.  It doesn’t take many words or a lot of time to make your heart known to everyone present.  A lot can be said in a really short time, so don’t feel like you have to make the vows any longer than they naturally come out.

Follow these four tips, and you’ll find yourself getting over your worries to write some great wedding vows that your spouse will love!

 

Second Wedding, Do It Right This Time…

 Tradition and etiquette dictates that second weddings should be simple and casual instead of being formal and extravagant. However, the number of second or encore wedding is sharply growing each year. Such ceremonies are designed to celebrate two people who want to embark on a new marriage with different partners.

Etiquette In Announcing Your Engagement
The immediate concern in planning a second wedding is how to announce this to you children. The children should always be the first be notified of your decision to remarry, as this will combine two already-established families. Expect you children to be stressed by your move and they will need a certain amount of time to accept the situation.

The bride and groom’s parents should be the next to be informed and then the respective ex’s. The ex-wife or ex-husband should make an effort to appease the children and reassure them about their roles in the new family.

Engagement rings from the past should not be worn anymore based on second wedding etiquette. All signs of previous relationships should be taken away once planning for the wedding and announcements are made.

A second marriage can be announced informally such as advertising it in the newspaper, making e-mails and phone calls. Under second wedding etiquette, the couple does not have to host an engagement party but a small gathering can be organized where you can make that important announcement.

Who’s Going?

Just about anybody can attend your second wedding. However, in observance of second wedding etiquette ex-spouses and former in-laws should not be invited even if you are in speaking terms to avoid awkwardness among the other guests.

The bride and groom should calculate a realistic budget for the wedding. This is a rare chance to again have the wedding of your dreams, it could be elegant, extravagant and intimate.

Vows and Ceremonies

Second wedding are normally made in civil ceremonies but can also be done in a religious ceremony. They are many ways to make the ceremony fell very intimate and special. Writing vows is common among second wedding and there is an abundance of books written about it. The children can be assigned to do an important part of the ceremony in order to foster unity. They can escort you while walking the aisle, read passages from the bible or serve as attendants in the event.

The closest family members and friends of the new couple can walk down the aisle or no one at all.

Are Bridal Showers Needed?
Bridal showers for encore brides are normally but this need to adhere with second etiquette rules.

–  Only guests should be invited
–  Club, Office and school showers can also be done and can be attende by other not on the official guest list. However, those that attended the bride’s first wedding should not participate.

Wedding Gifts and Registry

Some guests will have the uncontrollable urge to give something even if the couple does not want gifts.  It’s also acceptable for encore couples to sign in the gift registry.

Wedding Gift Ideas for Second Marriages
Gift certificates—restaurants, spas, stores
DVD player and DVDs
Charity Donatios
Coffee maker, pasta maker, cook books

Wedding Receptions and Parties
The reception of a second wedding may be extravagant or simple depending on the taste of the couple. The bride and gross will be first at the line and followed by their children. The traditional garter and bridal bouquet toss are optional.

Not Necessary In A Second Marriage

  Rehearsal Dinner
  Attendants
  Accompanying the bride down the aisle
  Procession

Advisable
–  Make a gift registry even if you don’t want gifts.<br><br>
–  The children should have responsibilities in the ceremony.<br><br>
–  Customize and personalize the wedding and reception.<br><br>

Please Avoid
–  Doing the same things in like your first wedding.
–  Wearing a similar wedding dress.
–  Marry in the exact spot of your first wedding.
–  Use old rings from a past marriage.
–  Criticizing former spouses

Optional

–  Showers
–  Engagement Party
–  Announcement in the newspaper
–  Rehearsal Dinner
–  A lavish wedding with attendants
–  Parents walking down the aisle
–  A different color for the wedding dress instead of white

Wedding Vows – Does the Word “Obey” Offend You?

One bride told her wedding planner, “Our pastor was going over our vows with us, but when he read the words “obey your husband,” I laughed out loud. He was offended and started on a lecture about how the wedding vows of the church say the wife should obey the husband.  How do I get out of this?”

Wedding vows are a controversial topic among today’s modern brides.  If you’re not a church-going couple, then it probably isn’t even an issue – you’ll simply change your wedding vows to say something to the effect of “love, honor, and cherish.” But if you’re being married in the church, you may run into some resistance.  Wedding vows are meant to be your promise to one another.  And for many women devoted to their faith, it’s a natural given that they’ll “obey” their husband.  So what does that mean?   Does it mean he barks orders at you all day and you dutifully do what he says?  No.  Obeying the husband, according to the church, is more about the father being the head of the family and leading his wife and kids toward a fulfilled life.  But if you dislike the word “obey,” then ou shouldn’t include it in your wedding vows – simple as that.

Any pastor who hasn’t run into this problem before must be very new to the job.  It’s rare to encounter one who openly disagreed with a bride about the exact wording of their wedding vows.   As a couple, you can opt to simply write your own wedding vows instead of using a pre-printed version – this will hopefully get you out of the embarrassing confrontation with your pastor.   Your groom may object to writing his wedding vows (many men don’t feel comfortable writing heartfelt prose).  If he’s worried, offer to work on them together – they don’t have to be a surprise.  Then when the time comes to go over them with your pastor, let him know that you’ve created your own.    And if you still wish to use the traditional wedding vows, substituting the word “cherish” for “obey,” then stand your ground.  Don’t let anyone bully you into promising something you don’t believe in.   If you’re a bride who does want to include “obey” in your wedding vows, then be proud of it – your faith and belief is equally as wonderful as the brides who want their modern independence.  To each her own.